Untitled (Door)

Daniel Buren
Untitled (Door)
2006
Sunset Door

Olafur Eliasson
Sunset Door
2006
Belly Door

Elmgreen & Dragset
Belly Door
2006
Lexikonzeichnung...

Katharina Fritsch
Lexikonzeichnung...
2006
A short text on the possibility of creating an economy of equivalence

Liam Gillick
A short text on the possibility of creating an economy of equivalence
2006
Untitled

Katharina Grosse
Untitled
2006
Reverse Perverse

Anish Kapoor
Reverse Perverse
2006
Endeavor [Los Angeles]

Sarah Morris
Endeavor [Los Angeles]
2006
Hilum

Paul Morrison
Hilum
2006
Fool

Tony Oursler
Fool
2006
Untitled

Jorge Pardo
Untitled
2006
Untitled

Wilhelm Sasnal
Untitled
2006
Regal (Shelf)

Thomas Schütte
Regal (Shelf)
2006
Aviso Publico / Public Notice

Santiago Sierra
Aviso Publico / Public Notice
2006
Slide

Luc Tuymans
Slide
2006
Three Women

Christopher Wool
Three Women
2006
 
 
Untitled (Door)
Daniel Buren

Untitled (Door)
2006

Glass door with translucent and opaline foil
concealed between two sheets of security glass.
Sizes vary with installation in architecture.
Example shown here: 220 x 95.7 cm (86½ x
37½ "). Edition: 15, each unique in color and/or size,
signed and numbered on separate label.


For more than thirty years, Daniel Buren (born 1938 in Boulogne-Billancourt, France, lives near Paris, works in situ) has been producing works that make direct reference to the space in which they are installed. He was one of the first to use the term in situ to describe his artistic practices. At the end of the 60s, Buren turned his back on painting and declared 8.7 cm vertical colored and white stripes to be the vocabulary of his art. Buren sees this pattern of stripes a visual tool which  as a signifier that can be reproduced and that does not have its own meaning  inscribes and questions all the variable sites of meaning. Since then his examination of the aesthetic, social, economic, and political frames for contemporary art have been the theme of his work. According to the artists conceptual ideas, the door illustrated here must be shown or installed in real architecture functioning as a door connecting/ dividing two rooms.




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Sunset Door
Olafur Eliasson

Sunset Door
2006

Wooden door panel with color effect filter
and light. Size: door 210 x 90 x 12 cm
(82¾ x 35½ x 4¾"), bucket 28 x 30 cm diam.
(11 x 12"). Edition: 15, signed and numbered
on separate label.

Sunset Door

Olafur Eliasson (born 1967 in Copenhagen, lives and works in Berlin and Copenhagen) belongs to a generation of artists who, in the nineties, explored and expanded the boundaries between art, science and nature and the perception thereof. For years, the artist has transferred natural phenomena such as water, light, wind, temperature and movement into the art context using simple technical aids, always emphasizing for the viewer the technology involved. The strongly atmospheric but entirely constructed nature of Eliasson´s works makes viewers become painfully aware of how far modern civilization has progressed from immediate experience; they question the acceptance of authenticity in the area of perception. The work shown here, Sunset Door, refers to a large-scale installation the artist created for the Turbine Hall in the Tate Modern, London, shown in October 2003 through March 2004. In this installation, The Weather Project, representations of the sun and sky dominate the expanse of the Turbine Hall. A fine mist permeates the space, as if creeping in from the environment outside. At the far end of the hall is a giant semi-circular form made up of hundreds of mono-frequency lamps. The arc repeated in the mirror overhead produces a sphere of dazzling radiance linking the real space with the reflection.
Mono-frequency lamps emit light at such a narrow frequency that colors other than yellow and black are invisible, thus transforming the visual field around the sun into a vast duotone landscape.




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Belly Door
Elmgreen & Dragset

Belly Door
2006

Wooden board with white painted (acrylic)
fiber glass resin on polyurethane foam.
Size: 200 x 100 x 40 cm (78¾ x 39½ x 15¾").
Edition: 15, signed and numbered on
separate label.


For more than a decade, the artists (Michael Elmgreen, born 1961 in Copenhagen and Ingar Dragset, born 1969 in Trondheim, Norway, both live and work in Berlin) have been collaborating on a wide range of installations, performances and environmental works. They create sculptures and installations that challenge conventional notions of institutions and public spaces within contemporary society. Since 1997, their Powerless Structures series of works has investigated how sites such as prisons, social security offices, hospitals, museums, galleries and parks exercise social control. The works deal with the issue of altering spatial conditions within various fields of the public realm: the urban landscape as well as the art institutional architecture. Architectural and social structures are reorganized in order to investigate the underlying desires of everyday objects and the mechanisms of ideological control in even the simple arrangements of walls, ceilings, entrances and exits. In the work shown here, the door which is an everyday interior achitectural element that we all relate to in a direct bodily way, has here become partly human itself.




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Lexikonzeichnung...
Katharina Fritsch

Lexikonzeichnung...
2006

[Lexikonzeichnung (2. Serie Mensch)]
Screenprint on both sides of an Amphibolin primed
wooden door panel. Size: 200 x 90 x 4 cm (78¾ x
35½ x 1½"). Edition: 15, signed and numbered on
separate label.


The sculptures of Katharina Fritsch (born 1956 in Essen, lives and works in Düsseldorf) have a way of imprinting themselves on one´s mind. With their simple outlines and bold use of color, they have the clarity of icons or pictographs. Her figures and objects are reminiscent of fairy tales, fables and myths. The attention Fritsch pays to the surfaces of the sculptures, and to their color, scale, and the space in which they are presented creates a strange tension between the familiar and the uncanny. A lifesize elephant is anatomically exact down to the last fold of skin, but painted in an unearthly blue-green. A man, tucked up in bed, is confronted by a giant black mouse that squats on his chest. The effect of giving solid reality to the visionary and fantastic is unsettling. It is a relationship that Fritsch is keen to explore: »I find the play between reality and apparition very interesting,« she says, »I think my work moves back and forth between these two poles.« Her sculptures open up dark areas of our collective consciousness and confront deep-seated anxieties, although this is often tempered by humor. Their iconography is drawn from many different sources, including Christianity, art history and folklore, without being reducible to a single source or meaning.
»My "drawings" were based on illustrations from a 1936 edition of the Duden pictorial lexicon. The book (...) always fascinated me as a child. It actually shows every aspect of life from birth to death in a dry, standardized form in little pictures. I was interested in this kind of standard drawing. What is a drawing? For me a drawing is first of all a sheet of white paper with black lines on it that represent something (...)« The Lexikonzeichnungen show »a strong, firmly fixed world order, borrowed from a nineteenth-century Romantic Germany that didn´t exist at the time either. That is the second plane of these drawings for me: black lines on a white background, (...) representing a completely intangible illusion.«




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A short text on the possibility of creating an economy of equivalence
Liam Gillick

A short text on the possibility of creating an economy of equivalence
2006

Stainless steel on laminated wooden door panel
with silkscreen in three color variations: white, black and orange. Size: 200 x 90 x 4.2 cm (78¾ x 35½ x 1½").
Edition: 15 (5 in each color), signed and numbered
on separate label.

A short text on the possibility of creating an economy of equivalence

Liam Gillick (born 1964 in Aylesbury, Great Britain, lives and works in London and New York) works in a whole range of different media. His art does not simply consist of spacious installations, graphically complex texts and minimalist objects. He also publishes full-length books, composes film music, arranges exhibitions and produces architectural designs. The "parallelism" of his work is crucial. On the one hand his projects are "free artistic expression"; on the other, they are "applied art", apparently with a clearly defined practical purpose.
Between the two spheres of activity, he creates for himself a space for discourse on a wide variety of subjects. Gillick´s aesthetic philosophy transcends the separation between pure theory and simple practicality, and that between poetic fiction and empirical fact. Gillick uses the forms and the materials of abstract art and of the Minimal Art of the sixties as tools to show to which degree our worldwide economic system has become even more abstract than the art of the same name. The title of the work shown here is the same as that of a large exhibition at the Palais de Tokyo, Paris and La Caas Encendida, Madrid in 2005. Both these exhibitions and the door relate to a work in progress - a lengthy text structure that focuses on post-industrial developments in consensus based European cultures. The door is a reference to a moment in the text when the former workers of a now-closed Swedish car factory return to their former workplace and rearrange the signage and information in order to create a new architecture of desire and refusal.




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Untitled
Katharina Grosse

Untitled
2006

Acrylic on wood door, hand painted by the artist.
Size: 198.5 x 86 x 4 cm (78 x 34 x 1½").
Edition: 15, each painting unique, signed and
numbered on verso.

Untitled

Katharina Grosse (born 1961 in Freiburg, lives and works in Düsseldorf and Berlin) covers things with color. Since the late 1990s, she has been applying acrylic paint to various grounds with a spray gun, which creates either very atmospheric, loose coverings or thick applications. Over time, Grosse has increasingly used the spray paint as a direct way to cover walls or architecture with colors: spare museum rooms or minimal industrial spaces. In these works, she always reveals the ability to incite both seduction and disgust, playing off sweet colors with harsh execution. For her, painting is the paradoxical mixing of ornament with puke.




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Reverse Perverse
Anish Kapoor

Reverse Perverse
2006

Acrylic glass sculpture in painted wooden
door panel. Size: door 200 x 90 x 4 cm
(78¾ x 35½ x 1½"). Sculpture 62 x 25 x 11 cm
(24½ x 10 x 4¼"). Edition: 15, signed and
numbered on separate label.

Reverse Perverse

Anish Kapoor (born 1954 in Bombay) has lived and worked in London for over thirty years. His work combines the spiritual traditions of his native country and the notion of the sublime from the Western art tradition. Since his first sculptures - simple forms covered with color pigments, arranged on the floor - Kapoor has developed a multi-faceted body of works using stone, steel or glass. In his objects and forms, the line between painting and sculpture becomes blurred. In the creation of three-dimensional bodies, his way of working is typical of the sculptor, but his themes - emptiness, absence, transformation and immateriality - derive from painting. Kapoor´s intention is to create sculptures that not only deal with questions of form but also address the themes of belief, passion or experiences beyond material concerns.




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Endeavor [Los Angeles]
Sarah Morris

Endeavor [Los Angeles]
2006

Silkscreen on metal door panel
Size: 211 x 90 x 4.5 cm (83 x 35½ x 1½").
Edition: 15, signed and numbered on
separate label.


The work of Sarah Morris (born 1967 in London, lives and works in New York and London) is concerned with decoding the built environment. Focusing on the urban experience, her work explores techniques of communication - the relationship between signs and symbols and their referents in the physical world. The 1997-99 Midtown series focused on the architecture of Manhattan skyscrapers as signifiers of urban life and corporate power. Architectural qualities became de-emphasized and fragmented into glossy, color saturated grid paintings. While the titles of Morris´ works refer to the original buildings on which they are based, the images hover between representation and abstraction, between shimmering facades and composed color fields through a process of graphic reduction. Following the principles of single-point perspective, the sheer hard-edged vibrancy of the compositions and colors suggests cityscapes with looming planes of gigantic proportions. Endeavor [Los Angeles] shown here is inspired by one of the most renowned talent agencies in the city. It is a panorama that absorbs viewers and sparks a number of thoughts. How can one create a fictional landscape? What are the limits of an abstract reading? What is the relationship of the individual to the corporation? What is the nature of conspiracy?




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Hilum
Paul Morrison

Hilum
2006

Polyurethane, CNC-milled, lacquered white,
on a wood door panel. Size: 196 x 88 x
4.8 cm (77 x 34½ x 2"). Edition: 15 , signed
and numbered on separate label.


The imagery of Paul Morrison (born 1966 in Liverpool; lives and works in London and Sheffield) has fused cartoon, scientific and art historical material ranging from botanical illustrations and Disneyesque flowers to old master paintings. »Drawing on plant imagery from popular and classical references, Morrison´s breathtaking compositions produced by eliminating color, leave the viewer to project their own associated vision onto the canvas, utilizing "color from behind the eye".«




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Fool
Tony Oursler

Fool
2006

Metal door with window and hardware,
DVD player and screen, DVD "Fool".
Size: 198 x 98 x 12 cm (78 x 38½ x 5"),
window 30 cm diam (12" diam.).
Edition: 15, signed and numbered on
separate label.

Fool

»Video is like water,« says Tony Oursler, »an entirely ethereal form which was locked into the television for 50 years.« The intelligent irony that resonates through the body of work of the American artist Tony Oursler (born 1957 in New York, lives and works in New York), namely, his video and projection installations, results from the subtle combination of sound, language, and pop culture images that suffuse it. Oursler´s videos often employ the strangely projected human face to create bizarre contemporary icons and fragmented narratives that, while containing a humorous element, also speak to the dislocation caused by contemporary issues of sex, violence, and power. Plumbing popular and pop culture for the twisted icons that structure our collective unconscious, Oursler creates fragmentary images and scenes that might belong to the hallucinations of a delinquent adolescent on a bad trip.




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Untitled
Jorge Pardo

Untitled
2006

Solid core MDF and chipboard door, custom paint
in different colors. Size: 203 x 107 x 9.5 cm
(80 x 42 x 3¾"). Edition: 15, signed and numbered
on separate label.

Untitled

Jorge Pardo (born 1963 in Havana, Cuba, lives and works in Los Angeles) creates objects that alternate between art, design, and architecture. His work raises questions about the effects that objects have when they are perceived. He is interested in the question: What does this object do? In exploring the crossover of private rooms, institutional spaces, and exhibition venues, Pardo is fundamentally investigating the characteristics of exhibition situations.




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Untitled
Wilhelm Sasnal

Untitled
2006

Screenprint (glossy black) on white painted wood
door panel. Size: 200 x 90 x 4 cm (78¾ x 35½ x 1½").
Edition: 15, signed and numbered on separate label.


The emphatically barren painting style of Wilhelm Sasnal (born 1972 in Tarnów, Poland, lives and works in Warsaw), often black and white and reduced to contrasts, is based on definite but widely divergent contexts. Whether these contexts be record labels, classic photographs, magazines, school or children´s books, sports, porn, comics or advertising of architecture - Sasnal´s characteristically desolate paintings contain a comprehensive recapitulation of reality, which concerns everything contemporary. Sasnal is very much at home in his own time and comfortable with its technologies, modes of communication, lifestyles, and imageries. His paintings express an exalted awareness of participating in a new, developing, and active world full of possibilities, as well as one of contradictions and antagonisms. Often, the sources cannot be directly made out, and the artist purposely makes them visually vague and undefined. He works with various fragmentation strategies, with an extreme view for details, and with elimination and reduction. He transforms a given image (assimilating it in a painterly way) until he has achieved a density that is as succinct as it is relevant. These paintings seem simple, but in fact they are condensations: substrata of a complex and multifaceted appropriation strategy for which Sasnal invents new interpretation patterns again and again.




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Regal (Shelf)
Thomas Schütte

Regal (Shelf)
2006

Hollow-core wood door panel construction, stained.
Size: 215 x 105 x 40 cm (84¾ x 41¼ x 15¾").
Edition: 6, signed and numbered on separate label.


The work of Thomas Schütte (born 1954 in Oldenburg, lives and works in Düsseldorf) is characterized by the use of heterogeneous media and has included installation, construction, sculpture, architectural models, painting, drawings, graphic works and watercolors. His exploration of the role of the sculptor has from the beginning been marked by virtuosity, diverse and thoughtful strategies, experimentation with scale, material, genre, and an independence of form. From early architectural models and theatrical constructions to houses and utilitarian design; from bunkers and hypothetical memorials to ironic monuments; from early figures, heads and vessels to fantasy action figures; and from ceramic "sketches" to bronze and steel "Frauen" (Women), Schütte´s body of work has embraced the symbolic, the memorial, the ironic, the functional, and the realm of social commentary. The object shown here derives from a group of wood works, new proposals for living, shown at Marian Goodman Gallery, New York in May/June 2005. The series of scale-model sculptural houses and works for an individually useable architecture - namely furniture - continues the trajectory of concrete designs for living and practical use-value in Schütte´s work that began with earlier models such as Westkunst, 1981, and was seen in subsequent works from 1982 to 1989.




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Aviso Publico / Public Notice
Santiago Sierra

Aviso Publico / Public Notice
2006

Metal sign (cast aluminum relief) on galvanized iron
door with hardware. Door size 198.5 x 98 x 12 cm
(78 x 38½ x 4¾"). Edition: 15, signed and numbered
on separate label.

Aviso Publico / Public Notice

Santiago Sierra (born 1966 in Madrid, Spain, lives and works in Mexico City) is one of the most controversial artists of the younger generation. His socio- and art critical actions stir up strong emotions in an art audience that has grown accustomed to aesthetic appearances. In 2000, for example, Sierra erected a wall in the New York PS1 gallery´s white cube that resembled the border fence between Mexico and the USA. Behind it, a volunteer lived for several weeks, supplied with only food and drink that was passed to him through a narrow opening much like in a prison. Formally, Sierra stands square in the tradition of Minimal Art, Land Art and Performance Art of the 60s and 70s. He considers himself an admirer of the minimalist objects by Judd, LeWitt, and Morris. But in contrast to these heroes, Sierra charges his work with direct, personally perceivable emotional violence, and political and individual reality.




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Slide
Luc Tuymans

Slide
2006

Thermo enameling on security glass plate.
Size: 200 x 90 x 0.9 cm (78¾ x 35½ x ¼").
Edition: 15, signed and numbered on separate
label.


Luc Tuymans (born 1958 in Mortsel, Belgium, lives and works in Antwerp) has been an observer of repeated historical and contemporary manifestations of horror. His paintings show a readiness to deal with these issues, continuing the tradition of Belgian artists such as James Ensor or Léon Spillaert, whose work thrived on the strange and the sinister. Violence and stillness are both the structures underlying Tuymans´ work. His pictures, which include both banal motifs from everyday life and explosive historical themes, can be grasped only with a highly focused gaze that goes beyond surface indistinctness. They reveal a superior, enigmatic level of meaning. His paintings often depict bleached out images that seem to barely surface, resolving and dissolving before the eye, images that are as much felt as seen. Tuymans calls his paintings "immaterial pictures", which seems to be a completely apt description of the work shown here, Slide II. Sourcing many of his images from film and photography, Tuymans sees celluloid and paint as equally influential. His use of the formal techniques of photography and film - editing, cropping and full page bleeds - promotes an unsettling energy in his work.




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Three Women
Christopher Wool

Three Women
2006

Three silkscreens on Saunders Watercolor
paper 410 g. Size: 207 x 127 cm
(81½ x 50"). Edition: 9; each of three images
(I - III) printed in three shades of rose: light,
medium, and dark. All signed and numbered.
[not available]

Three Women

Since the late 1970s, Christopher Wool (born 1955 in Chicago, lives and works in New York) has readdressed and expanded the process of painting. He developed reduced pictorial forms with a radical orientation towards flatness and an aloof, ornamental, all-over style, almost always working in black and white. After his characteristic word pictures and his painting with floral patterns in the 1980s and 1990s, Wool recently has worked in a free, gestural and complexly layered painting style showing an open process of placement and cancellation. He erases parts of his painting, and then overwrites it in a loose graffiti-like gesture. In his working processes, he uses silkscreen to duplicate paintings and subsequently works the reproductions further ("painted silkscreens"). The prints made for the Door Cycle reflect Wool´s continuous intermediate use of silkscreen and at the same time they are an homage to de Kooning´s painting style and coloring of his 1964-66 Women paintings.




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